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Tara K. Harper Web Site:
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One evening, I sat Beauty in my lap.--And
I found her bitter.--And I cursed her.

                                     - Une Saison en Enfer, 1873, Arthur Rimbaud


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Aeschylus
Albee
Angelou
Apollonius
Aristophanes
Arouet
Aurelius
Augustine
Austin
Bacon
Baudelaire
Beckett
Bellow
Beowulf
Blake
Bly
Bradstreet
Bronte
Browne
Browning
Burns, O.
Burns, R.
Buson.
Byron
Callimachus
deCervantes 
Chaucer
Chekhov
Clemens
Coleridge
Congreve
Conrad
Cooper
Cowper
Crane
cummings
Dante
Defoe
Dickens
Dickenson
Dickey
Donne
Dostoevsky
Dove
Doyle
Dryden
Dumas
Eliot
Emerson
Erdrich
Euripides
Faulkner
Fet
Fielding
Fitzgerald
Frost
Fry
Fuentes
Ginsberg
Grass
Hardy
Hawthorne
Heaney
Hecht
Hemingway
Herodotus
Hesiod
Hesse
Homer
Horace
Hugo
Ibsen
Irving
James
Johnson
Jonson
Joyce
Kafka
Keats
Kerouac
Kesey
Kipling
Lang
Langland
Lawrence
Lear
Lee
Levertov
London
Longfellow
Lorca
Lucretius
Mackay
Malamud
Malory
de la Mare
Marlowe
Marquez
Melville
Menander
Miller
Milton
Mukherjee
Nash
Neruda
O'Brien
Olson
Ovid
Parker
Paz
Plath
Plato
Poe
Pope
Pound
Pushkin
Pyle
Ralegh
Rawlings
Rilke
Roethke
Rowlandson
Ryuichi
Salinger
Sandburg
Scott
Seneca
Sexton
Shadwell
Shakespeare 
Shaw
Shelley

Singer
Smith, Dave
Solzhenitsyn

Sophocles

Spenser
Stafford
Steinbeck
Stevens
Stevenson
Stowe
Swift
Synge
Szymborska
Tan
Tennyson
Thackeray
Thomas
Thompson
Thoreau
Thucydides
Thurber
Tolstoy
Twain
Updike
Virgil
Voltaire
Warren
Webster
Whitman, R.
Whitman, W. 
Wilde
Williams
Woolf
Wordsworth
Yeats


A

"The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them."
            - Mark Twain


Aeschylus   (525 - 456 B.C.)   First of the three great Athenian poets of tragedy.
     - Laius  - Lost to us; first of the three plays which tell the story of Oedipus' family.
     - Oedipus  - Lost to us; second of the three plays which tell the story of Oedipus' family.
     - The Seven Against Thebes  - ca.  467 B.C.;  online text.  Third of the three plays which tell the story of Oedipus' family.
     - Prometheus Bound  - ca. 430 -?? B.C.;   online text
     - The Oresteia  - A trilogy of plays:
             - Agamemnon   - online text
             - The Libation Bearers
             - The Eumenides  - "The Furies," ca. 458 B.C.;   online text
     - The Choephori,  ca. 450 B.C.online text
     - The Persians  - ca. 472 B.C.;   online text
     - The Suppliants  - ca. 463 -?? B.C.;   online text

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Albee, Edward  (playwright)
     - Tiny Alice  - First performance, December 29, 1964
     - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
     - Tall Women
     - A Delicate Balance

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Angelou, Maya -- Irritating author site that has disables the Back key.
     - I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
     - The Heart of a Woman
     - I Shall Not Be Moved
     - All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes

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Apollonius Rhodius  (ca. 295 - 215 B.C.).  
At one time, Apollonius served as head librarian of the Alexandrian Library.  However, where his peers turned to writing plays, he turned instead to writing epic poems.  
     - Argonautica   - online text

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Aristophanes  (455? - 385 B.C.)  Best known for The Clouds and The Frogs
     - The Acharnians  - ca. 425 B.C.;  online text
     - The Birds  - ca. 414 B.C.;   online text
     - The Clouds  - ca. 419 B.C.;  online text
     - The Frogs  - ca. 405 B.C.;   online text
     - The Thesmophoriazusae  - ca. 411 B.C.;   online text

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Arouet, Francois-Marie   - See Voltaire 

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Aurelius  (161-180)
Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, best known for his Meditations on Stoic philosophy.  Still considered (in the West) to epitomize the Golden Age of the Roman Empire.
     - Meditations  - ca. 167 A.D.; also quotes.

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Augustine  - Saint Augustine, or Aurelius Augustinus  (354 - 530); including links to online texts
     - The Confessions of Saint Augustine (397-401)
     - The City of God (413 - 426)
     - Soliloquies

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Austin, Jane  (1775 - 1817).  Novels include:
     - Pride and Prejudice
     - The Three Sisters
     - Emma
     - Lady Susan
     - Lesley Castle

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B


Bacon, Sir Francis   (1561-1626).  Also:  selected essays and poems online and critical essays
     - Of Truth
     - Of Marriage and Single Life
     - Of Studies
     - Of Negotiating
     - Novum Organum  (The Idols)
     - The New Atlantis  (or, Solomon's House)

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Baudelaire, Charles Pierre  (1821 - 1867)
     - Les Fleurs de Mal
     - The Poem of Hashish
     - Artificial Paradises

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Beckett, Samuel - playwright
Murphy (1918)       Krapp's Last Tape and Other Dramatic Pieces
Waiting for Godot Poems in English
- Happy Days - Molloy  (written in French)
How It Is - The Unnamable  (written in French)
- Endgame - Malone Dies  (written in French)
- Proust - Watt
- Stories & Texts for Nothing - Film
- More Pricks Than Kicks

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Bellow, Saul  -  (1915 -- ??).  Nobel Laureate.

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Beowulf
Composed (it is speculated) in the first half of the 8th century.  In 1731, the manuscript was damaged in a fire, so that many lines and words were lost.  However, the poem's text was probably corrupted during the many transcriptions which must have been made between the poem's composition and the translations later made from the copy of the fire-damaged manuscript.  Beowulf is the oldest known epic English poem, and was intended for oral performance.  It is the first of the oral poems which survived the translation from spoken to written literature.
     - Also, feuds in Beowulf
     - Also, an essay on Beowulf
     - Also, a message board discussion group for Beowulf

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Blake, William   - Also, links

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Bly, Robert  (b. 1926).  American poet.

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Bradstreet, Anne  (ca. 1612 - 1672)
Bradstreet was a Puritan who was raised with an education superior to that of most women at that time.  She married a man who was sent to America one year after they were married.  She sailed with him and found the New World difficult.  However, since it was the will of God that she live there with her husband, she submitted to that life.  She continued to write poetry, as she had done as a child.  In 1650, her brother-in-law, without her knowledge, took a manuscript collection of her poems to London and had them printed.  Anne Bradstreet is the author of the first published volume of poetry written by an American resident.  Her meditations and poems provide an historical picture of the religious fervor with which the new Americans lived.  

Bradstreet lived at a time when her duty was clearly defined as that of bearing children, serving her husband, and examining her conscience.  Her health was not strong enough for pregancy, but she risked death eight times to bear children for her husband.  Before the Birth of One of Her Children speaks to her husband, asking him not to remarry after she died, so that her children would not be beaten or poorly cared for by the new wife whom she assumed he would take after her death.  In another poem, she berates herself for grieving for a child, since the Puritans believed that children had no souls until they had received proper religious instruction:  "...Blest babe, why should I once bewail thy fate, / Or sigh thy days so soon were terminate, / Sith thou art settled in an everlasting state."  (From In Memory of My Dear Grandchild Elizabeth Bradstreet, Who Deceased August, 1665, Being a Year and Half Old.)  

By ritualizing her circumstance via poetry--including the burning of her home in 1666--into a statement of God's will, not her own good or bad fortune, Bradstreet was able to lessen the impact on herself of her own tragedies.
     -  Selected poetry  - online texts

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Bronte, the sisters.  Also, the Bronte Home Pages, various quotes from Charlotte Bronte's work, and complete online texts of the Bronte sisters' poems.

Charlotte Bronte  (1816 - 1855).  It is speculated that she died from an illness associated with pregancy.  She also wrote under various pseudonyms, including Currer (for Charlotte), Acton (for Anne), and Ellis Bell (for Emily).
     - Jane Eyre  - 1846, under the pseudonym Currer Bell.  Online text
     - Shirley  - 1849, under the pseudonym Currer Bell.  Online text
     - Villette  - 1953, under the pseudonym Currer Bell.  Online text
     - The Professor  -1857  (under a pseudonym?).  Online text

For amusement:  David Brown's Jame Eyre, a short parody of Bronte's Jane Eyre .

Bronte, Emily  (1818 - 1848).  Bio
     - Wuthering Heights  - online text
     - I Am the Only Being Whose Doom (poem)  - online text
     - Love Is Like the Wild Rose Briar (poem)  - online text
     - Love and Friendship  - online text
     - Faith and Despondency (poem)  - online text
     - Methinks this heart (poem)  - online text
     - She Dried Her Tears (poem) - online text
     - Last Words (poem) - online text

Anne Bronte
     - Agnes Grey  - online text
     - The Tenant of Wildfell Hall  - online text

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Browne, Sir Thomas  (1605-1682)

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Browning, Robert  (1812 - 1889).  Biography, selected bibliography, and links to Browning pages. Also, a more in-depth biograpy.
     - Selected poetry

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Burns, Olive Ann.  Short bio.  
     - Cold, Sassy Tree

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Burns, Robert  (1959 - 1796).  The Electric Scotland is a free newsletter that includes a section devoted to Burns.  Also, just for fun, The Haggis, and A Toast to the Lassies.
     - Complete poetry  - online texts
     - Selected poetry  - online texts to what some consider his finest works:
            - Tam O'Shanter
            - Holy Willie's Prayer
            - Address to a Haggis
            - Auld Lang Syne
            - A Man's A Man for a' That
            - My Luve is Like a Red, Red Rose
            - The Cotter's Saturday Night
            - Address to the Unco Guid
            - To A Mouse
            - Epistle to a Young Friend

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Buson, Taniguchi  - Japanese poet and painter (1715 - 1783).  Also known as Yosa Buson. Short bio.
     - Selected Poetry  - online texts (2-page listing)
     - Also:  online images of and information about some of Buson's paintings.

Dawn--
Fish the cormorants haven't caught
Swimming in the shallows.

        [ Translated by Robert Hass  ]

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Byron   - Lord George Gordon Noel Byron  (1788 - 1824).  Extensive site that includes biographical information, selected letters, and critical opinions.  Also, Poetry links and another, brief biography on the literature site.

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C

"I criticize by creation - not by finding fault."
              - Cicero (106-43 B.C.)


Callimachus  (ca. 310 - 240 B.C.).  Greek poet and critic, and chief librarian of the famous Alexandria library.  Brief biography.  
     - The Aitia  - Literally, "Causes."  Approximately 7000 lines long, though only fragments have survived, mostly on scraps of papyrus.
     - Hymm V:  The Bath of Pallas
     - Also various epigrams...

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de Cervantes, Miguel   - Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; born (estimated) September 27, 1547; died April 23, 1616
     - Don Quixote  (part 1:  1605;  part 2: 1615); online text in English and in Spanish
     - La Galatea  (1585)
     - Novelas exemplares  (1613)

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Chaucer, Geoffrey  (1343-1400).  Also:  the Chaucer Pedagogy, and the Harvard Chaucer Page, including course notes, analyses, etc.
     - The Canterbury Tales - online texts in both Middle and Modern English.
     - Pilgrims
     - Troilus and Cressida  - online text in Middle English
     - Complaint to His Purse
     - Gentilesse
     - The House of Fame - online text in Middle English
     - Merciles Beaute
     - Against Women Unconstant - online text in Middle English
     - The Parliament of Fowls - online text in Middle English
     - To His Scribe Adam
     - To Rosamond
     - Truth
     - Also:  online texts of other works

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Chekhov, Anton  (1860 - 1904 -??)  Also spelled "Chehov"
Worked as a general practitioner in Moscow while also working as a writer, selling short stories and sketches.  He published 129 short stories and sketches in 1885;  112 in 1886;  66 in 1887;  and 12 in 1888, but he spent more and more time perfecting each story, thus producing less, but which was of higher quality, and all the while, continuing to practicing medicine.  Chekhov:  "Medicine is my legal spouse, while literature is my mistress.  When I get tired of one, I go and sleep with the other..."  All of his major plays were written in the last 15 years of his life.

Taken from Elisaveta Fen's introduction to Anton Chehov:  Three Plays:     "It is characteristic of Chehov that a few hours before he died he was making up a humorous story as he sat in bed, at which his wife was able to laugh wholeheartedly.  Neither of them realized how near was his end until he awoke the same night, feeling very ill, and asked her to send for the doctor.  Chehov said to him:  "I am dying."  The doctor ordered ice to be put on his heart.  "You don't need to put ice on an empty heart," said Chehov.  The doctor then gave him champagne.  Chehov sat up, smiled and said to his wife:  "It's long since I last drank champagne!"  He emptied his glass, leaned back and died..."
     - Ivanov  (1887-8)
     - The Boor  (1888 -?)
     - The Wood Demon  -1888-1889.  Was severely criticized, considered unsuitable for the stage, and was not produced as a play until after his death.  Chekhov was demoralized enough by this severe reaction that he did not write for seven  years.  Much later, he rewrote this piece and recast it into the play, Uncle Vania.
     - The Sea Gull  - 1896.   Initial production was "a resounding failure."  After Uncle Vania was well-received, this was produced again by a master producer, and became a complete success.  It was also the instigation of a new dramatic style:  the "theatre of moods" or of "underground streams of emotion."
     - Uncle Vania  (1896)
     - Three Sisters  (1900)
     - The Cherry Orchard  (1903)

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne - Writing under the pseudonym, Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)
     - The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County
     - The Awful German Language  - including online text
     - The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  - online text.  WARNING:  large file.
     - The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
     - Old Times on the Mississippi
     - The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson  - online text
     - A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court  - online text
     - The Prince and the Pauper  - online text
     - The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg
     - What Is a Man?
     - Bible Teaching and Religious Practice
     - Thoughts of God
     - Cannibalism in the Cars
     - The Innocents Abroad

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Coleridge, Samuel Taylor  (1774 - 1834).  His science, philosophy, and theology.  A timeline of his life, letters, and online texts of poems, including:
     - Kubla Khan  - online text
     - Christabel  - online text
     - The Rime of the Ancient Mariner  - online text
     - On Donne's Poetry  - online text

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Congreve, William  (1670 - 1729).  Also, in-depth biography and brief biography.
     - The Old Bachelor  (1693)
     - The Double Dealer  - A near failure
     - Love for Love  (1695)
     - The Mourning Bride  (1697)
     - The Way of the World  - 1700; Congreve's greatest work; failed miserably when first produced and resulted in Congreve quitting the stage for the rest of his life.  This play is considered the finest example of a comedy of manners, and has never been successfully produced on-stage.  It is now considered to be literature, rather than a stage play.

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Conrad, Joseph  (1857 - 1924).  Site of the Joseph Conrad Society.
Teodor Josef Konrad (baptized, Catholic name).  Family name:  Nalecz Korzeniowski.  Born in Berdyczew, in Russian Poland, the son of a country gentleman, educated in in the city and by private tutors.  Raised by his maternal uncle from the age of 12 (his mother died when he was eight and his father died when he was twelve).  Conrad became a competent master mariner in the British merchant marine.  Wrote all his stories in English.  He did not begin writing until he was 35; his first novel was published in 1895.  

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Cooper, James Fenimore  (1789 - 1851)  James Fenimore Cooper Society site.  Also, bio.

Cooper was most reknowned for:
     - The Leather-Stocking Tales:  - in order of the chronology of Natty Bumppo:
               - The Deerslayer  (1841)
               - The Last of the Mohicans  (1826)
               - The Pathfinder  (1840)
               - The Pioneers  (1823)
               - The Prairie  (1827)

The site includes online texts for little known and hard-to-find works, such as The Water Witch; or, The Skimmer of the Seas.

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Cowper, William  (1730 - 1800).  Minor site with a very few works online.  Also, the Cowper and Newton Museum, including biographical information about his early, middle, and later years.
     - Two Poems
     - The Diverting History of John Gilpin  - online text
     - The Colubriad  - online text
     - The Castaway  - online text

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Crane, Stephen  (1871 - 1900).  Stephen Crane Society, including online texts for many of Crane's works.  Also, a timeline biography, the American Poems site for Stephen Crane, including online texts of many poems, and a links page to Stephen Crane sites.
     - The Red Badge of Courage
     - The Black Riders and Other Lines - experimental poetry, 1895
     - War Is Kind and Other Lines  - online text
     - The Black Riders and Other Lines  - online text

                    
                    The Heart

                    In the desert
                    I saw a creature, naked, bestial
                    Who, squatting on the ground,
                    Held his heart in his hands,
                    And ate of it.
                    I said, "Is it good, friend?"
                    "It is bitter--bitter," he answered;
                    "But I like it
                    Because it is bitter,
                    And because it is my heart."

                               - Stephen Crane
                    

     - The Monster and Other Stories (1899)
     - Whilomville Stories (1900)
     - Maggie:  A Girl of the Streets   - his first novel, 1893
     - The Little Regiment  - short fiction

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cummings, e. e.  (1894 - 1962).  American poet.  A short bio and an extensive selection of poems with online texts.
____________________

Buffalo Bill's

Buffalo Bill's
defunct
   who used to
   ride a watersmooth-silver
        stallion
and break onetwothreefourfive pigeonsjustlikethat
                 Jesus

he was a handsome man
                and what i want to know is
how do you like your blueeyed boy
Mister Death
____________________

gee i like to think of dead

gee i like to think of dead it means nearer because deeper firmer
since darker than little round water at one end of the well it's
too cool to be crooked and it's too firm to be hard but it's sharp
and thick and it loves, every old thing falls in rosebugs and
jackknives and kittens and pennies they all sit there looking at
each other having the fastest time because they've never met before

dead's more even than how many ways of sitting on your head your
unnatural hair has in the morning

dead's clever too like POF goes the alarm off and the little striker
having the best time tickling away everybody's brain so everybody
just puts out their finger and they stuff the poor thing all full
of fingers

dead has a smile like the nicest man you've never met who maybe winks
at you in a streetcar and you pretend you don't but really you do
see and you are My how glad he winked and hope he'll do it again

or if it talks about you somewhere behind your back it makes your neck
feel pleasant and stoopid and if dead says may i have this one and
was never introduced you say Yes because you know you want it to dance
with you and it wants to and it can dance and Whocares

dead's fine like hands do you see that water flowerpots in windows but
they live higher in their house than you so that's all you see but you
don't want to

dead's happy like the way underclothes All so differently solemn and
inti and sitting on one string

dead never says my dear,Time for your musiclesson and you like music and
to have somebody play who can but you know you never can and why have to?

dead's nice like a dance where you danced simple hours and you take all
your prickly-clothes off and squeeze-into-largeness without one word and
you lie still as anything in largeness and this largeness begins to give
you,the dance all over again and you,feel all again all over the way men
you liked made you feel when they touched you(but that's not all)because
largeness tells you so you can feel what you made,men feel when,you touched,
them

dead's sorry like a thistlefluff-thing which goes landing away all by
himself on somebody's roof or something where who-ever-heard-of-growing
and nobody expects you to anyway

dead says come with me he says(andwhyevernot)into the round well and
see the kitten and the penny and the jackknife and the rosebug
and you

say Sure you say (like that) sure i'll come with you you say for i
like kittens i do and jackknives i do and pennies i do and rosebugs i do

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D


Dante  (Dante Alighieri; 1265 - 1321).   Downloadable texts.  Information about Dante exhibitions.
     - Inferno.  Online text.  Also, recommended English translations:
                   - Dante's Inferno, Translations by 20 Contemporary Poets
                   - The Inferno of Dante, A New Verse Translation by Robert Pinsky, Bilingual Edition
     - The Divine Comedy  - complete texts online  for both Longfellow's and H.F. Cary's translations.  Also, complete text in original Italian

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Defoe, Daniel  (1660 - 1731).  Brief bio, and more in-depth bio.
Born in London as James Foe, of Flemish stock.  He changed his name to Defoe around 1695.  Was the author of 560 books, journals, and pamphlets from satirical to dramatic topics, in history, social science, crime, and biography.  Was imprisoned various times for debts and other, more political transgressions.
       - Captain Singleton
       - Colonel Jack
       - A Journal of the Plague Year  - online text
       - Memoirs of a Cavalier
       - Moll Flanders  - online text.  Note:  this is an irritating site that disables the Back key.
       - On the Education of Women  - online text
       - Robinson Crusoe  - online text
       - Roxana
       - The True Born Englishman  - satirical poem (1701)

                  

                  Wherever God erects a house of prayer,
                  The Devil always builds a chapel there;
                  And 't will be found, upon examination,
                  The latter has the largest congregation.

                       - From The True-Born Englishman, Part i

                 

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Dickens, Charles  (1812 - 1870).  Another extensive Dickens site, as well as the Charles Dickens Gad's Hill Place (usually broken links, but some good quotes).  In-depth bio, and much more extensive biographical info, a Dickens timeline, and online texts of his works.  Also, the Victorian political history and the social and political context of his works.

Dickens work is available online from a variety of sources.
     - Pickwick Papers - Dickens' first novel; serialized from April 1836 to November 1837.  Most famous of all pre-Victorian novels.
     - David Copperfield
     - A Tale of Two Cities  (1859)
     - Great Expectations  (1860-61)
     - A Christmas Carol  (1843) - One of the "Christmas Books" (short novels)
     - The Chimes  (1844) - One of the "Christmas Books" (short novels)
     - Oliver Twist (1837-39)
     - Nicholas Nickleby (1838-39)
     - The Old Curiosity Shop (1840-41)
     - Barnaby Rudge (1841)
     - Martin Chuzzlewit (1843-44)
     - Dombey and Son (1846-48)
     - Bleak House (1852-53)
     - Hard Times (1854)
     - Little Dorrit (1855-57)
     - Our Mutual Friend (1864-65)
     - The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870), only half-completed.
     - The Cricket on the Hearth (1845)
     - The Battle of Life (1846)
     - The Haunted Man (1848)

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Dickenson, Emily  (1830-1886).  Online texts of poems (WARNING:  this is an irritating site with a popup for every click you make).  Also, links to magazine/journal articles about Emily Dickenson.

             

             435           

             Much Madness is divinest Sense --
             To a discerning Eye --
             Much Sense--the starkest Madness--
             'Tis the Majority
             In this, as All, prevail--
             Assent--and you are sane--
             Demur--you're straightaway dangerous--
             And handled with a Chain--
             

             From 709:

             Publication--is the Auction
             Of the Mind of Man--
             

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Dickey, James  - poet, novelist  (1923 - ).  Born in Atlanta, Georgia; Dickey wrote more than 17 books of poetry, 14 books of prose (including the famous novel, Deliverance, which was later made into a film) and sound recordings.  In-depth bio.
     - Deliverance - novel
     - Cherrylog Road
     - The Shark's Parlor  - online text
     - For the Last Wolverine  - online text

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Donne, John  (1572 - 1631)
      - Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, Meditation VXII   (1624)  - online text

No man is an island. entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were. Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.

                         -  From Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, John Donne

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Dostoevsky, Fyodor  (October 30, 1821 -  1881)
All his work was published serially in Russian periodicals.  Four major features of his writing, often assumed now to be simply features of Russian writers:  amazing truthfulness in his descriptions of life, deeply described and well-delineated characters, mastery in describing the social conditions of his protagonists, and wonderfully artistic sense of tragedy.
     - Mary Stuart  - 1841, a historical drama.  Has not been preserved.  One of Dostoevsky's first literary efforts.
     - Boris Godunov  - 1841, a historical drama.   Has not been preserved.  One of Dostoevsky's first literary efforts.
     - The Idiot (1867)
     - The Devils (also known as The Possessed)
     - Poor Folk (1846)
     - The Grand Inquisitory
     - The Double  -1846; Subtitled:  A Petersburg Poem
     - The Honest Thief  (1848)
     - The peasant Marey
     - The Christmas Tree and a Wedding  - artistically perfect, satiric
     - White Nights  (1848)
     - The Gambler
     - The Village of Stepanchikovo  - 1861?; comic masterpiece
     - The Insulted and Injured (1861)
     - Notes from House of the Dead (1861-62)
     - A Disgraceful Affair  (1862)
     - Winter Notes on Summer Impressions (1862)
     - Notes from the Underground  - 1864; English title only.  Actual title:  Memoirs from a Dark Cellar
     - Crime and Punishment  - 1866
     - The Eternal Husband  (1870)
     - The Adolescent -  1874; English title only.  Actual title:  The Raw Youth.  Thought to be his weakest novel.
     - A Gentle Creature (1876)
     - The Dream of a Ridiculous Man  (1877)
     - The Brothers Karamazov

"The starving soul is humbled and driven to submission, seeking salvation in gin and dissipation and beginning to believe that this is the way things ought to be.  Facts oppress the spirit, and if scepticism is born, it is a gloomy, accursed sort of scepticism which seeks salvation in religious fanaticism."

                            - Dostoevsky, about his travels abroad in an1863 issue of Vremya (Time)

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Dove, Rita  - Nobel Laureate poet.

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Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan.  Brief bio.
     - original Sherlock Holmes stories online

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Dryden, John
     Selected poetry and prose online (complete texts or excerpts)
     - The State of Innocence  - completed 1673-4?; never played
     - Mac Flecknoe  - satire
     - Absalom and Achitophel  - satire
     - The Medal  - satire
     - All for Love  - drama
     - Anne Killigrew  - ode
     - St. Cecilia's Day - ode
     - Alexander's Feast  - ode
     - Religio Laici   - verse essay, 1682
     - The Hind and the Panther  - online text; 1687
            Symbolism in the Hind and the Panther, summarized from John Dryden, Selected Works, commentary by William Frost:  The Hind = Roman Catholicism; the Panther = the Church of England; the Bear = The Congregationalists (originally known as the Independents); the Hare = the Quakers, who would not take oaths; the Ape = the atheists or freethinkers; the Boar = the Baptists; Reynard the Fox = the Unitarians; the Wolves = the Presbyterians, who believed in predestination; the Lion = King James II, who had recently issued a declaration of religious tolerance in England; Caledonia = England; Pan = Christ; the Swallows = English Catholics; the Martins = a priest or party of priests who were in favor of pro-Catholic measures taken by King James; the unnaturally clement weather = the reign of King James; and the disasters  = predictions of the plight of Catholics after the reign of James ended.

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Dumas, Alexandre (1802 - 1870), including online texts to most of his major works, in both English and French.  Also, short bio, a more in-depth bio, yet another bio, and the 1911 encyclopedia article on Dumas.
     
- The Three Musketeers (marvelous!)  - online text
     - The Count of Monte Cristo (marvelous!) - online text
     - Twenty Years After (incredibly depressing) - online text
     - Le Vicomte de Bragelonne  - Note that this story, when translated into English, is usually published as three volumes:
               - The Vicomte de Bragelonne
               - Louise de la Valliere
               - The Man in the Iron Mask

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E


Eliot, T. S.  Includes online text of poems.  Brief bio.
     - The Wasteland - including notes and symbolism
     - Gerontion
     - Burbank with a Baedeker: Bleistein with a Cigar
     - Sweeney Erect
     - A Cooking Egg
     - Le Directeur
     - Mélange Adultère de Tout
     - Lune de Miel
     - The Hippopotamus
     - Dans le Restaurant
     - Whispers of Immortality
     - Mr. Eliot's Sunday Morning Service
     - Sweeney among the Nightingales

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Emerson, Ralph Waldo  (1803 - 1882).  Includes online texts of his work, other notes.

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Erdrich, Louise  (1954 -- )
     - Beet Queen
     - Love Medicine

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Euripides
Nineteen plays have been found/preserved.  Ten of his plays were selected for educational reasons ansd so were copied and preserved.  Nine others were found later during the classical revival that occurred in the 1200 - 1400's A.D.  Some sources maintain that only eighteen plays have been found (seventeen tragedies and Orestes, a satyr play), and that it is possible that Rhesus was not authored by Euripides.  
The plays originally preserved are: The nine plays found later:
     - Medea  - ca. 431 B.C.      - The Heracleidae  - ca. 429 - ?? B.C.
     - Hippolytus  - ca. 428 B.C.      - Andromache  - ca. 428-24 B.C.
    - The Bacchantes  - ca. 410 B.C.      - The Suppliants  - ca. 422 B.C.
     - Iphigenia In Tauris  - ca. 414-412 B.C.         - Heracles  - ca. 421-416 B.C.
     - The Trojan Women  - ca. 415 B.C.      - Helen  -  ca. 412 B.C.
     - Ion  - ca. 414-412 B.C.      - The Phoenissae  - ca. 411-409 B.C.
     - Alcestis  - ca. 438 B.C.      - Iphigenia At Aulis  - ca. 410 B.C.
     - Electra  - ca. 420-410 B.C.      - The Cyclops  - ca. 408? B.C.
     - Hecuba  - ca. 424 B.C.      - Orestes  - ca. 408 B.C
     - Rhesus  - ca. 450 B.C.

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F


Faulkner, William - One of America's Nobel Prize-winning authors.  Also a recipient of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.  Born in Mississippi in 1897; educated at the University of Mississippi (but did not graduate), served in the British Royal Air Force during WWI, and drifted to New Orleans, where he began writing for "little magazines."
     - Mosquitoes - an early novel
     - Soldier's Pay - an early novel
     - The Sound and the Fury - an early novel
     - Absalom, Absalom!
     - Go Down, Moses
     - Intruder in the Dust
     - Light in August
     - Sanctuary
     - As I Lay Dying
     - The Unvanquished

"Man is tough.  Nothing -- war, grief, hopelessness, despair -- can last as long as man himself can last;
man himself will prevail over all his anguishes, provided he will make the effort to stand erect
on his own feet by believing in hope and in his own toughness and endurance."

                            - Faulker

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Fet  - Afanasy Afanasyevitch Fet.   Russian poet in the era of the Tsars.

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Fielding, Henry  (1707-1754).  English novelist and dramatist.   In-depth bio.  Also, another biography, and Morality in Fielding's Novels.
Wrote comedies for the stage, but his satires and burlesques attacked the Walpole government and resulted in the Licensing Act of 1737.   This act was a censorship of the stage, and Fielding quit the writing to turn to novels.  Fielding was appointed magistrate for Westminster, and later, with his blind half-brother, created London's first formal police force, the Bow Street Runners.  Works include:
     - Joseph Andrews  (1742)
     - Jonathan Wild  (1743)
     - The History of Tom Jones   (1749)

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Fitzgerald, F. Scott  (1896 - 1940).  bio.    Also bio and summaries of his works and online texts
     - The Great Gatsby (1925)
     - This Side of Paradise (1920)

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Frost, Robert  (1875 - 1963)  A short bio and bibliography, a life sketch,
     - Selected poems , such as Acquainted with the Night, others  -  online text  
     - Selected poems, including:
               - Mowing  - online text
               - October  - online text
               - An Old Man's Winter Night  - online text

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Fry, Christopher  (b. 1907)  Actor, playwright, and director.  Brief bio and bibliography, and a 1989 interview with Christopher Fry.
On poetry:   "Poetry is the language in which man explores his own  amazement."
     - The Boy with a Cart
     - Curtmantle
     - The Dark Is Light Enough
     - The Firstborn
     - The Lady's not for Burning, 1949  - online text
     - A Phoenix too Frequent
     - A Sleep of Prisoners
     - Thor, with Angels
     - Venus Observed

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Fuentes, Carlos  (b. 1928) -- Mexico's most influential writer.  An interview.

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G


Ginsberg, Allen  (1926 - 1997)
     - Howl  - online text, also here.  Also description and analysis.  Also here.  
     - Sunflower Sutra  (1955) - online text
     - Kaddish  (1960)  - online text.  Description and analysis
     - A Supermarket in California  - online text

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Grass, Gunter.  Timeline biography.
Grass is one of Germany's favorite authors.  A modern writer, he took up the tradition of baroque and melancholy literature, and explored themes such as vanity, carpe diem, and Senecan Stoicism.  
     - The Tin Drum
     - The Flounder
     - Local Anaesthetic

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H

If a man sow evil, he shall reap evil increase; if men do to him as he has done, it will be true justice.

                          -The Great Works, Hesiod


Hardy, Thomas.  Also, an overview site.
     - Far From the Madding Crowd

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Hawthorne, Nathaniel  (1804 - 1864).  Extensive site with online texts, portraits, and links to other sites.  Earliest American master of the short story and the romance.  A short bio.
     - Twice Told Tales  (1937)  - including online text
     - The Whole History of Grandfather's Chair  (1840)
     - Mosses from an Old Manse  (1846) - including online text, criticisms, etc.
     - The Scarlet Letter  (1850) - online text
     - The House of the Seven Gables  (1851)  - including online text
     - The Blithedale Romance  (1852)  - online text, including author's preface
     - The Snow-Image and Other Twice-Told Tales (1852)  - online text
     - The Life of Franklin Pierce  (1852)
     - A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys  (1852)  - online text
     - Tanglewood Tales  (1853)  - online text
     - The Marble Faun  (1860)  - online text and notes about publication versions.
     - "Chiefly About War Matters"  (1862)
     - Our Old Home  (1863)  - online text
     - The Wives of the Dead

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Heaney, Seamus  - Nobel Laureate Poet, Irish
     - Digging

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Hecht, Anthony  - poet.  Overview site.  Extracts from an interview with Phillip Hoye.  Brief bio.

Online texts of a six poems:
     - Saul and David
     - Witness
     - Late Afternoon:  The Onslaught of Love
     - Curriculum Vitae
     - A Hill
     - Prospects

Also:
     - A Letter  - online text
     - Eclogue of the Shepherd and the Townie  - online text  (Note:  file also contains Curriculum Vitae)

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Hemingway, Ernest.   Also:  Bio, and another, more in-depth bio.

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Herodotus  (490 - 425 B.C.)
     - The History of Herodotus  - ca. 440 B.C.;  online text

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Hesiod  (estimated to have lived during the 7th century B.C)
The father of Greed didactic poetry.  Only two of his epic poems have been preserved, one relating to mythology of the gods, the other to peasant life (The Great Works, or, Works and Days)
     - The Great Works  - the verse of the slaying of Rhadamanthys:  "If a man sow evil, he shall reap evil increase; if men do to him as he has done, it will be true justice."
     - Theogony  - online texts in English and Greek.  Also:  Another translation.
     - Shield of Heracles  - online texts in English and Greek

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Hesse, Herman   - German home site.  Also, brief bio in English.
     - Der Steppenwolf
     - Siddhartha
     - Demian
     - Magister Ludi  - won the Nobel Prize for Literature
     - Beneath the Wheel

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Homer   (estimated to have lived during the late 8th century B.C).  An essay/article on Homer.
     - The Iliad  - online text
     - The Odyssey  - online text

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Horace  - Quintus Horatius Flaccus  (65 - 8 B.C.)
     - Odes  - 103 short lyric poems comprising four books
     - Satires

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Hugo, Victor.  In-depth bio.  The Victor Hugo Central web site is irritating to navigate, but does provide reviews, essays, biographical information, etc.
     - The Hunchback of Notre Dame
     - Notre-Dame de Paris  (1831)
     - Les Miserables  (1862)
     - Ruy Blas

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I


Ibsen, Henrik  (1828 - 1906) - Norweigan playwright.  An in-depth bio, and another even more in-depth bio.  A site with essays submitted by netizens.

Ibsen's early works were written between 1850 and 1873, and include Peer Gynt and The League of Youth.  His major prose plays include:
- Pillars of Society  (1877)        - The Lady from the Sea  (1888)
- A Doll House  (1879)      - Hedda Gabler  (1890)
- Ghosts  (1881)      - The Master Builder  (1892)
- An Enemy of the People  (1882)      - Little Eyolf  (1894)
- The Wild Duck  (1884)      - John Gabriel Borkman  (1896)
- Rosmersholm  (1886)      - When We Dead Awaken  (1899)

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Irving, Washington  (1783 - 1859)  A bio, another site with portraits and short bio, and a more in-depth bio.
     - The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
     - Rip Van Winkle
     - The Spectre Bridegroom
     - Little Britain  - online text
     - A History of New York (1809)  - notes and excerpts

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J


James, Henry  (April 15, 1843 - February 28, 1916). Works online
     - The American
     - The Aspern Papers
     - The Turn of the Screw

 We trust to novels to maintain us in the practice of
great indignations and great generosities.

                             - Henry James, in an essay on Anthony Trollope:

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Johnson, Samuel  (1709 - 1784).  Full texts online, including:
     - Rambler essays  (1750-1752)
     - The Life of Savage
     - Dictionary
     - The Vanity of Human Wishes (1749)
     - Idler essays  (1758-1760)

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Jonson, Ben  (1573 - 1637).  A short bio and another bio.  Also, an extensive listing of critical essays and articles on Jonson and his works.
     - Selected works  - online text
     - Selected plays and other works, original spellings  - online text
     - Selected poems  - online text
     - Selected monologues  - online text

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Joyce, James  (  )  Also, a James Joyce Resource Center, and the Brazen Head, with extensive links
     - A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
     - The Dubliners (incredibly depressing)
     - Ulysses
     - Finnegan's Wake

"Why don't you write books people can read?"
                                          - Nora Joyce to her husband James

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K


Kafka, Franz.  Died 1924, of tuberculosis.  In-depth bio.
     - Metamorphosis
     - The Trial

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Keats, John  (1795-1817)  Extensive site that includes biographical information, online texts of poems, letters, and a message forum for discussion.  Also, a links site for pages relating to Keats, and just for interest's sake, an extensive list of Victorian links.

Selected poetry online, including:
     - La Belle Dame Sans Merci  - online text
     - Ode on a Grecian Urn  - online text
     - When I Have Fears that I May Cease to Be  - online text
     - Endymion  - books I-IV
     - Lamia  - online text
     - Hyperion

Also, index of poetry online, by first lines.

               

               This Living Hand, Now Warm and Capable

               This living hand, now warm and capable
               Of earnest grasping, would, if it were cold
               And in the icy silence of the tomb,
               So haunt thy days and chill thy dreaming nights
               That thou wouldst wish thine own heart dry of blood
              So that in my veins red life might stream again,
               And thou be conscience-calmed--see here it is--
               I hold it towards you.

                          - John Keats
                

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Kerouac, Jack   (1922 - 1969)  A bio and timeline.
     - The Town and the City
     - The Dharma Bums  - analysis and excerpts
     - The Subterraneans
     - On the Road  - analysis and excerpts
     - Big Sur  - analysis and excerpts

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Kesey, Ken.  Short bio, the LitKicks bio, and another slightly longer bio.  Also a 1992 interview by Todd Fahey, and the Fenex/Rick interview.
     - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest  - brief bio and notes.  And more notes.
     - Sometimes a Great Notion
     - The Demon Box

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Kipling, Rudyard  (1865 - 1936)  Nobel Laureate in Literature.  Short bio, and a slightly longer bio.
     - Selected poems  - online text
     - The Jungle Book
     - The White Man's Burden  -  Regarding the debate about imperialism in the United States.
     - Captains Courageous

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L


Lang, R. D.  - poet;   - no satisfactory reference, historical, or literary sites yet located

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Langland, William  (1330 - 1387).  A short bio.  Is considered the author of over 45 manuscripts for the Middle Ages poem, Peres the Ploughmans Crede, often titled to The Vision of William concerning Piers the Plowman.  However, modern scholars believe there were five authors who wrote the Crede, and the manuscripts have been grouped into three "manuscript traditions," and called simply the A, B, and versions.

The Vision of Piers Plowman - online text of B version and detailed analysis.  Published 1377-1379
      Also:  the poem by section (select Langland in the author listing)


                

                Excerpt from The Crede of Piers the Ploughman
                William Langland

                As I went on my way,
                I saw a poor man over the plough bending.
                His hood was full of holes,
                And his hair was sticking out,
                His shoes were patched.
                His toes peeped out as he the ground trod.
                His wife walked by him
                In a skirt cut full and high.
                Wrapped in a sheet to keep her from the weather.
                Bare foot on the bare ice
                So that the blood flowed.
                At the field's end lay a little bowl,
                And in there lay a little child wrapped in rags|
                And two more of two years old upon another side.
                And all of them sang a song
                That was sorrowful to hear.
                The all cried a cry,
                A sorrowful note.
                And the poor man sighed sore and said
                "Children be still."
                

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Lawrence, D. H.   David Herbert Lawrence was born in Nottinghamshire in 1885 as the fourth child of a coal miner.  Died in Venice in 1930.  Also:  biographical information divided by eras in Lawrence's life.  Selected poems online.
     - The White Peacock - his first novel
     - The Rainbow - 1915, novel
     - Women in Love - 1916, novel
     - Lady Chatterly's Lover - his last novel; online text.  Also, the history of the story.
     Also:  various short stories, novelettes, and nonfiction pieces on nature, ethics, philosophy, men and women, etc., including:
          - Christs in the Tirol
          - Men Must Work and Women Also
          - Pornography and Obscenity

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Lear, Edward  (1812 - 1888)  Biographical info, including timeline.  A very short bio.
     - Complete limericks , and selected songs and stories  - online text w/drawings
     - Selected poems  - online text
     - More selected poems  - online text
     - Over 150 selected poems  - online text
     - Lear's picture stories  - online version
     - The Jumblies  - online text
     - The Owl and the Pussy-Cat  - online text.  Also here.

Also:
     - The Death of Edward Lear, by Donald Barthelme

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Lee, Harper  (Nelle Harper Lee, b. April 28, 1926)  Biography.  Also:  biographical information about Nelle Harper Lee and other members of her family.
     - To Kill a Mockingbird  - symbolism and lecture notes.  Also:  Student Survival Guide, a guide to over 400 terms and idioms used in Lee's book.

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Levertov, Denise  (1923 - 1997) - English-born, but considered to be an American poet.  Short bio, another short bio, and obituary and timeline biography.  Also her final interview.

        Poets differ from other people only in having a specially intimate relation to words.
                                   - Denise Levertov, in a statement written in response
                                        to an invitation to "comment on any topic,"
May, 1972,
           

Online texts of dozens of poems, including:
     - The Great Black Heron
     - Sojourns in the Parallel World
     - Losing track.
     - In California during the Gulf War
     - Talking to Grief
     - September 1961
     - In Mind
     - Untitled
     - 'I learned that her name was Proverb
     - Stepping Westward
     - The ache of marriage
     - Seeing For A Moment
     - A Woman Alone
     - From the Roof
     - Talk in the Dark

The Beat Page's biographical info and text of three selected poems:
     - Talking to Grief
     - September ,1961
     - In Mind

Also speeches:
     - Speech for a Rally, april 15, 1970  - full text
     - Statement for a TV program, May 1972  - full text
     - Address to the International Meeting of Writers, Bulgaria, September 28, 1980  - full text

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London, Jack  (1876 - 1916). Including:
     - The Call of the Wild
     - The Sea Wolf
     - White Fang

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Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth.  In-depth bio.  Also, a site with links to societies, museums, etc.

There is another site with online texts of what appears to be all of Longfellow's poems, but it's incredibly irritating.  You have to either "visit our sponsor" or wait 9 seconds before you can be directed to the actual collection and texts of the poems.

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Lorca, Federica Garcia  - poet
     - Song of the Barren Orange Tree  - online text
     - Song of the Horseman  - online text
     - Romance of the Moon (Ballad of the Moon)  - online text
     - Farewell  - online text
                   
Adam
         (A Tree of Blood)

    A tree of blood soaks the morning
where the newborn woman groans.
Her voice leaves glass in the wound
and on the panes, a diagram of bone.

    The coming light establishes and wins
white limits of a fable that forgets
the tumult of veins in flight
toward the dim cool of the apple.

    Adam dreams in the fever of the clay
of a child who comes galloping
through the double pulse of his cheek.

    But a dark other Adam is dreaming
a neuter moon of seedless stone
where the child of light will burn.
 

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Lucretius  - Titus Lucretius Carus  (ca. 98 - 55 B.C.)
     - De Rerum Natura  - "On the Nature of Things."  An epic poem in six books that is a philosophical treatise on Epicurus, Democritus' atomic theory, the rejection of superstitious fears, and the cultivation of a tranquil mind via the banishing of all trace of fear in the reader's mind.  Online text.

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M


Mackay, Charles.  Brief bio.  A site with links to some of his online works.  Also, popular quotes online.
   - The Sea-King's Burial  - online text
             

             No Enemies

             You have no enemies, you say?
             Alas, my friend, the boast is poor.
             He who has mingled in the fray
             Of duty, that the brave endure,
             Must have made foes.  If you have none,
             Small is the work that you have done.
             You've hit no traitor on the hip,
             You've dashed no cup from perjured lip,
             You've never turned the wrong to right,
             You've been a coward in the fight.

                             - Charles Mackay
             

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Malamud, Bernard  (1914 - 1986).  Short bio.
     - The Natural  (1952)  - his first novel
     - The Fixer  (1966)  - won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award
     - The Assistant  (1957)
     - Idiots First  (1963)
     - The Magic Barrel  - received a National Book Award, 1958
     - A New Life
     - Pictures of Fidelman  (1969)
     - Dubin's Lives  (1979)
     - Rembrandt's Hat  (1973)
     - The Tenants

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Malory, Sir Thomas  (ca. 1405 - 1471)
     - La Morte d'Arthur

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de la Mare, Walter  (1873 - ??).  Short bio

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Marlowe, Christopher  (1564 - 1593)
     - Hero and Leander
     - The Passtionate Shepherd to His Love   -  "Come live with me and be my love, / And we will all the pleasures prove,...."   This is the original; other poets rewrote and satirized this one.
     - Tamburlaine
     - The Massacre at Paris
     - The Jew of Malta
     - Edward UU
     - Dr. Faustus

                

                 I charge thee to return, and change thy shape;
                 Thou art too ugly to attend on me:
                 Go, and return an old Franciscan friar...

                      - The initial entrance of Mephistopheles; from The Tragicall
                         History of the Life and Death of Dr. Faustus,
1624

                

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Marquez, Gabriel Garcia  - Nobel Laureate, Columbia.  Extensive bio.
     - One Hundred Years of Solitude
     - Strange Pilgrims  - Including:  The Trail of Your Blood in the Snow

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Melville, Herman  (1819 - 1891)
From the Norton Anthology of American Literature:  "Biographers justifiably hold that Melville's mature psychology is best understood as that of the decayed patrician."   Well.  I think that pretty much covers it.

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Menander  (ca.  342 B.C. - 292 B.C.).  Brief bio, and another brief bio.
Athenian dramatist.  Considered one of the supreme poets of comedy (comedy of manners, or, the New Comedy, which was essentically somewhat burlesque reenactments of famous myths).  Menander wrote over 100 plays from 321 B.C. to his death in 292 B.C., but he won only eight victories at Athenian dramatic festivals.  Only a few fragments of his work were known until four different plays came to light in 1906 in Egypt.  They were written on papyrus and preserved well enough  that all 1328 lines could be translated.
     - Dyskolos  - "The Bad-Tempered Man"  - online text

Also, the Yale-New Haven site about Dyskolos, which includes a description of New Comedy, and other aspects of Menander's work, such as a summary of the play, Menander's depiction of cooks and slaves, and so on.

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Miller, Arthur   (b. 1915)  Brief biography and a listing of plays and other works by Miller.
     - Death of a Salesman  (1949)  - won the Pulitzer Prize
     - All My Sons  (1947)
     - The Crucible  (1953)

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Milton, John  (Born December 9, 1608  Died in 1674).   Biography.  Also, links to online texts in various formats, and the Dartmouth listing of online poems..
     - Lycidas (1637) - From his early years, when he was a serious student, before he became concerned primarily with political and social issues and actions.
     - Paradise Lost (1667) - A poem "justifying the ways of God to men;"
     - Paradise Regained (1671) - Christ's temptation in the wilderness.
     - Samson Agonistes (1671)
     - Areopagitica

    Also various occasional verse:
     - L'Allegro
     - Il Penseroso
     - Arcades (a masque)
     - Comus (A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle, 1634) - a children's play
     - How Soon Hath Time
     - On the New Forcers of Conscience Under the Long Parliament
     - On the Late Massacre in Piedmont
     - When I Consider How My Light Is Spent

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Mukherjee, Bharati  (b. 1940)  Bio.  Also, an interview and an online Q&A interview with Mukherjee.
     - The Middleman  - Collection of short stories, 1988
     - Darkness  - Collection of short stories, 1985
     - The Tiger's Daughter
     - Wife
     - Jasmie
     - Days and Nights in Calcutta  - nonfiction, 1977
     - The Sorrow and the Terror  - nonfiction,  1987

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N


Nash, Ogden
     Selected works  - online text

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Neruda, Pablo  - Nobel Laureate poet
     - Fully Empowered
     - Ode to the Book

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O


O'Brien, Flann  (1911 - 1966)  
Brian O'Nolan wrote under many pseudonyms, of which Myles na gCopaleen (Myles of the Ponies) was probably the most famous.  He also wrote under the pseudonyms:   the Count O'Blather, George Knowall, Peter the Painter , Brother Barnabus, John James Doe, Winnie Wedge, and An Broc.  Some works online.
     - The Dalkey Archive (1964).   Adapated by Hugh Leonard for the Abbey Players in 1964, under the title, When the Saints Go Cycling In.
     - The Hard Life: An Exegesis of Squalor  (1961)
     - The Third Policeman  - Published posthumously in 1967; his other comic masterpiece
     - At Swim-Two-Birds (1939).  Comic masterpiece
     - An Béal Bocht  - "The Poor Mouth"  (1941).  His only book written in Gaelic, called "a subversive anti-pastoral" novel, translated into English in 1964.
     - Faustus Kelly  - a satirical look at local authorities
     - The Insect Play  - an adaptation of Karel Capek's play
     - Thirst  - A full-length play, of which he completed only the first act before dying, but which seemsto be and is produced as a complete one-act play.

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Olson, Charles   (1910 - 1970).  Poet.  Links to various types of critical information about Olson, including a bio.  Also, another short bio.
     - :La Chute  ("The Drum")

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Ovid  - Publius Ovidius Naso  (43 B.C. - A.D. 17).  Quotes from Ovid.
     - Amores
     - Ars Amatoria  - "The Art of Love;"  A how-to handbook of seduction, published approximately 2 B.C. which resulted in Ovid's banishment from Rome; he died in exile.  Section titles included:  Where to Find a Woman, Get Acquainted with Her Maid, Lessons for the Ladies, Some Technical Instructions, etc.
     - Metamorphoses  - online text
     - Tristia  - Ovid's last poems, written while he was in exile

Also:  online texts of Ovid's works, but these are posted in sections; you have to click and click and click and click...

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P


Parker, Dorothy  (1893 - 1967).  Sharp-witted, scathing, satirical, wonderfully amusing American critic.

                

                  Résumé

                  Razors pain you;
                  Rivers are damp;
                  Acids stain you;
                  And drugs cause cramp.
                  Guns aren't lawful;
                  Nooses give;
                  Gas smells awful;
                  You might as well live.

                

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Paz, Octavio  - Nobel Laureate poet

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Plath, Sylvia   - A  Sylvia Plath page, a bio, a brief bio.  Also:  poetry online.

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Plato  ( ca. 427 - 347 B.C.)  Another Plato site.  Summary of Plato's philosophy, and another take on his philosophy.  Also:   Plato for the Young Inquirer
     - Lysis
     - Euthydemus  - ca. 380 B.C.;   online text
     - Apology - online text
     - Crito  (including:  Socrates and the Laws)
     - Phaedo  - ca. 360 B.C.;  online text, including:   The Death of Socrates
     - Protagoras
     - Phaedrus
     - The Symposium   - online text,  including:  Alcibiades
     - Epistle VII  (including:  Plato and Politics)
     - The Republic  - ca. 360 B.C.
              - The Republic, Book II  - online text
              - The Republic, Book VIII - online text
     - Theaetetus

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Poe, Edgar Allen    Also:  bio, a brief chronology, and his use of drugs and alcohol.  Also  complete works online, and another Poe site.
     - The Cask of Amontillado  - online text
     - The Pit and the Pendulum  - online text
     - The Black Cat
     - The Tell-Tale Heart  - online text
     - The Assignation  - online text

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Pope, Alexander  (1688-1744).  English poet and satirist.  Extremely brief bio.
     - Epilogue to the Satires  (1738)
     - The Dying Christian to His Soul
     - The Rape of the Lock  - cantos I through V - online texts.  Also the Rape of the Lock home page.
             - The Key to the Rape of the Lock  - a humorous explanation by Pope; online text
     - Essay on Criticism -- cantos I thorugh III  - online texts
     - An Essay on Man
             - Epistle I:  Of the Nature and State of Man with Respect to the Universe
             - Epistle II:  Of the Nature and State of Man with Respect to Himself, As an Individual
             - Epistle III:  Of the Nature and State of Man with Respect to Society
             - Epistle IV: Of the Nature and State of Man with Respect to Happiness

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Pound, Ezra   (1885 - 1972).  Bio, another Ezra Pound site, with extensive links, and a site with an extensive list of resources (not online)/
     - Alba  - online text
     - An Immorality  - online text
     - The Garden  - online text
     - The Garret  - online text
              

               In a Station of the Metro

                  The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
                  Petals on a wet, black bough.

              

     - Sestina: Altaforte  - online text
     - From the Cantos:
              - Canto I, ``And then went down to the ship''  - online text
              - Canto XIII, ``Kung walked/ by the dynastic temple''  - online text
              - Canto XLIX, ``For the seven lakes''  - online text
     - From the translations of Li Po,
              - Jewel Stairs' Grievance
              - Taking Leave of a Friend
              - The River-Merchant's Wife  - online text

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Pushkin  - Alexander Sergeyevitch Pushkin  (1799 - 1837).  An irritating site (feels as if every other word is a link) with biographical info
     - Eugene Onegin - The first, formative, modern Russian novel; a novel in verse
     - Boris Goudonov
     - The Gypsies

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Pyle, Howard  (1853 - 1911).  Bio.
     - The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood  - online text, more online texts, and the Gutenburg project's online text (also available zipped).

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Q

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R

The eye, of course, is not enough.  But the outer eye serves the inner eye, that's the point.

                 - Theodore Roethke


Ralegh, Sir Walter  (1552 - 1618).  Biographic facts, interesting notes, more bio info, and a very brief description of his downfall.  A more extensive bio, a brief BBC bio that focuses on his failures, another blithe bio from the BBC, and a set of biographical links.  Also, Queen Elizabeth's Charter to Sir Walter Ralegh, 1584.

Selected works online.  Also:
     - A Report of the Truth of the Fight About the Isles of Azores This Last Summer Betwixt the Revenge, One of Her Majesty's Ships and an Armada of the King of Spain
     - Letter to His Wife Before Dying  - online text, and notes and online text
     - The Dutie of a King in His Royal Office - excerpt
     - The Silent Lover  - online text
     - The Passionate Man's Pilgrimage  - online text
     - Poem to Queen Elizabeth I  - online text
     - What is our life?  A play of passion  - online text
     - The Nymph's Reply  - online text

                 

                  What is our life? A play of passion,
                  Our mirth the music of division;
                  Our mothers' wombs the tiring-houses be
                  Where we are dressed for this short comedy;
                  Heaven the judicious, sharp spectator is
                  That sits and marks still who doth act amiss;
                  Our graves that hide us from the searching sun
                  Are like drawn curtains when the play is done:
                  Thus march we, playing, to our latest rest,
                  Only we die in earnest, that's no jest.

                 

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Rawlings, Marjorie Kinnan  (1896 - 1953).  Bio info, more bio info and her fascination with Cross Creek, Florida, and her obituary in the NYT.  Photos of Rawlings and her farm at Cross Creek.
     - South Moon Under, 1933
     - Golden Apples, 1935
     - The Yearling, 1938, which won the Pulitzer prize
     - When the Whippoorwill, 1940
     - Cross Creek, 1942
     - The Sojourner, 1953

"Writing is agony for me. I work at it eight hours every day,
hoping to get six pages, but I am satisfied with three."

                             - Rawlings to an interviewer

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Rilke, Rainer Maria  (1875 - 1926).  Also bio, and an extensive bio  Brief bio, bibliography, and links.  Considered to be one of Germany's best-loved poets, the pre-eminent modern poet of solitude and inwardness.
     - Dream-Book
     - Lay of the Love and Death of Cornet Christoph Rilke
     - Rodin-Book
     - Poems from the Book of Hours
     - The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge - prose
     - Possibility of Being
     - Duino Elegies - considered to be Rilke's masterpiece.  Second elegy online

                       

                        Every angel is terrible
                             And still, alas
                                   knowing all that
                        I serenade you
                             you almost deadly
                                   birds of the soul.

                                          - excerpt from the second elegy, Duino Elegies

                       

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Roethke, Theodore  (1908 - 1963).  Brief bio, selected bibliography, and links; more extensive bio info.  One of America's most respected poets.  Selected poems online, and some of his most famous works, annotated.
     - Open House (1941).  The collection of poems which started his career.
     - The Waking  -  Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1953  - online text
     - Words for the Wind  - Recipient of a National Book Award and also the Bollingen Prize in Poetry of Yale University
     - The Far Field  - Winner of a National Book Award in 1965  - online text
     - Night Journey  - online text
     - The Reckoning  - online text
     - I Knew a Woman  - notes
     - The Flight  - notes

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Rowlandson, Mary  (estimated to have lived from 1636 - 1678).  Brief bio.
     - A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson  - A record of Rowlandson's eleven months in Indian captivity during Philip's Wars.  - full text online

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Ryuichi, Tamura  (1923 - 1998).  A post-WWII Japanese poet of the Waste Land group.  Short bibliography.  Interesting notes on various translations of Ryuichi's work.  More notes on translations (better translations), and some bio info.
     - Two poems, online texts, simplistic translations
     - My Imperialism

                       

                        I sink into bed
                        On the first Monday after Pentecost
                        And bless myself
                        Since I'm not a Christian

                                  - excerpt (first four lines) from My Imperialism

                       

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S

"I never write about myself.  But people like X, Y and Z--and I'm speaking now only aout male writers--do nothing but write about themselves and they are considered marvelous, objective writers and I'm considered vain.  To have this reputation is the sign of some sort of social insanity."
                              - Gore Vidal


Salinger, J. D.  (b. 1919).  Bio, bios written by college students, an informative, but somewhat snotty bio, links to Salinger articles and reviews on the NYT.
     - The Catcher in the Rye
     - Seymour, an Introduction
     - Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters
     - Nine Stories
     - Franny and Zooey

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Sandburg, Carl  (1878 - 1967).  Bio, brief bio, another brief bio, and a chronological bio.  Highly recommended poet!  Poems online.  also:
     - Chicago Poems  - (public domain);  online texts
     - Cornhuskers  - online texts by contents, titles, and first lines

Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have,
and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let
other people spend it for you.

           - Carl Sandburg

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Scott, Sir Walter  (1771 - 1832).  Scottish author and poet in the Victorian period, but who actively support English policies and education.  Scot published his novels anonymously, and enjoyed perpetuating the mystery even after he saw them achieve popularity.  The anonymously published novels were eventually grouped, with notes or titles such as, "by the author of Waverley," (a group called the Waverly novels), "Tales From Benedictine Sources", and so on.  Bio and bibliography, another bio, a brief bio, and yet another brief bio.   Also, links to Web resources on Scott.

Poetry online.  Also
     - The Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1805
     - The Lady of the Lake, 1810
     - Marmion, 1808
     - Waverley, 1814
     - Guy Mannering (The Astrologer), 1815  - online text, including criticisms, notes, introductions, etc.
     - The Antiquary, 1816
     - Old Mortality, 1816
     - Rob Roy, 1817
     - Ivanhoe,  1819
     - Quentin Durward, 1823
     - The Talisman

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Seneca (Lucius Annaeus Seneca (b. 4 BC).  Roman playwright, orator and philosopher.  He adapted the work of other playwrights (Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, etc), but some speculate that he never intended for his own versions to be performed on stage, but to be used instead for study or as recitations for private audiences.  A relatively detailed bio, another bio, and a theatrically oriented bio.

An overview of the eight Seneca tragedies. Also:
     - Trojan Women
     - Thyestes  -  summary, critique, various translations, and latin and another translation
               - The Fury's monologue from Thyestes  - online text
               - Second chorus from Thyestes  - online text
     - Phaedra
     - Medea
    - Agamemnon  - the original latin
             - Cassandra's monologue from Agamemnon  - online text
     - Octavia  
             - Octavia's monologue  - online text

Also:  general notes on Roman tragedy.

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Sexton, Anne   (1928 - 1975).  A bio, a brief bio, and an obnoxious page with extremely brief bio info, and a short bio from Fembio.  Another brief bio, with extensive online texts of her poems.  Highly recommended poet!
     - Small Wire  - online text
     - Music Swims Back to Me  - online text
     - Lessons  in Hunger  - online text
     - The Fury of Beautiful Bones  - online text
     - After Auschwitz  - online text
     - The Expatriates  - online text

       

The Fury of Abandonment

Someone lives in a cave
eating his toes,
I know that much.
Someone little lives under a bush
pressing an empty Coca-Cola can against
his starving bloated stomach,
I know that much.
A monkey had his hands cut off
for a medical experiment
and his claws wept.
I know tht much.

I know that it is all
a matter of hands.
Out of the mournful sweetness of touching
comes love
like breakfast.
Out of the many houses come the hands
before the abandonment of the city,
out of the bars and shops,
a thin file of ants.

I've been abandoned out here
under the dry stars
with no shoes, no belt
and I've called Rescue Inc. -
that old-fashioned hot line -
no voice.
Left to my own lips, touch them,
my own nostrils, shoulders, breasts,
navel, stomach, mound,kneebone, ankle,
touch them.

It makes me laugh
to see a woman in this condition.
It makes me laugh for America and New York city
when your hands are cut off
and no one answers the phone.

.

.

Excerpt from
After Auschwitz

Anger,
as black as a hook,
overtakes me.
Each day,
each Nazi
took, at 8:00 A.M., a baby
and sauteed him for breakfast
in his frying pan.

And death looks on with a casual eye
and picks at the dirt under his fingernail.

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Shadwell, Thomas  (b. 1642? - d. 1692)  Dramatist; contemporary of Dryden.  Bio.  A few of his poems online.  Also:
     - The Sullen Lovers  - his first play
     - Epsom Wells
     - Psyche
     - The Medal - a derogatory poem written in retaliation for Dryden's satirical attack titled MacFlecknoe.
     - The Miser
     - The Humorists
     - The Hypocrite
     - The Virtuoso
     - The True Widow
     - The Squire of Alsatia  - his last play

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Shakespeare, William  (1564 - 1616).

Resources:
     - The Shakespeare Resource Center site, with extensive links
     - The Oxford Society page on Shakespeare
     - An educational site with extensive links
     - A site that discusses and defends Shakespeare's authorship
     - The Absolute Shakespeare site, including trivia, notes on the Globe Theatre, and more about the authorship debate
     - A list of quotes that are often mistakenly attributed to Shakespeare.

Biographical info:  An extensive, full-text online bio in chapters.  Another extensive bio, including information on his parents, marriage, fellow actors, etc.  A Shakespeare timeline.  Also a short bio, another brief bio and biblio, college student info on Shakespeare.

Online Works:
     - Complete online texts of Shakespeare's plays and sonnets
     - Complete plays online:  comedies, histories, and tragedies
     - Alphabetical listing of plays online, with the original spellings
     - The University of Virginia's set of early works online, with irritating line numbers
     - Bartleby's plays online
     - Selected sonnets online, including:
             - When I do count the clock that tells the time  - online text
             - Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?  - online text
             - When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes  - online text
             - Not marble, nor the gilded monuments  - online text
             - That time of year thou mayst in me behold  - online text
             - They that have power to hurt and will do none  - online text
             - Let me not to the marriage of true minds  - online text
             - My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun  - online text
             - Two loves I have of comfort and despair  - online text
     - An analysis and critique of sonnet 55, including original and modern text

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Shaw, George Bernard  (1856 - 1950) . Bio and bibliography, a short bio, another short and interesting bio, and another bio.  Was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1925:  "For his work which is marked by both idealism and humanity, its stimulating satire often being infused with a singular poetic beauty."  He despised organized learning, his first five novels were rejected; and he was finally published as a music critic, after which he became one of England's most famous satirists, wits, and "shavians."
     - How to Write a Popular Play (essay), 1909  - online text
     - Capital Punishment (essay), 1948 - online text
     - Plays Pleasant and Unpleasant
              - Widower's House, 1892
              - The Philanderer, 1893
              - Mrs. Warren's Profession, 1893
              - Arms and the Man, 1896
              - Candida, 1896
              - You Never Can Tell , 1896
     - Three Plays for Puritans:
              - The Devil's Disciple, 1897
              - Caesar and Cleopatra, 1899
              - Captain Brassbound's Conversion, 1900
     - Pygmalion  - online text
     - Man and Superman  - online text
     - John Bull's Other Island, 1904
     - Major Barbara, 1905
     - Heartbreak House

Also:  Shaw on vegetarianism, and John Palmer's lengthy discussion of Shaw:  Harlequin or Patriot?.

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Shelley, Percy Bysshe  (1792 - 1827).  Brief bio, another bio, another brief bio, a short bio from the Neurotic Poets page, and a chronological bio.  Also:
     - Poetry online - complete texts  (see left-hand column)
     - University of Toronto's RPO site, with selected poetry and notes  - online texts
     - Bartleby's complete poetical works  - online texts, with an extreme number of pop-ups
     - Popular quotes from Shelley's poems
     - An article on Shelley's Defense of Poetry

                       

                        Ozymandias

                        I met a traveller from an antique land,
                        Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
                        Stand in the desert... Near them, on the sand,
                        Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
                        And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
                        Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
                        Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
                        The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed:
                        And on the pedestal these words appear:
                        "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
                        Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
                        Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
                        Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
                        The lone and level sands stretch far away.

                       

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Singer, Isaac Bashevis  (1904 - 1991)
Born in Poland, Singer moved to the United States in 1935.  He began his literary career at the age of 1922, and wrote over forty books and many short stories.  He wrote in Yiddish, which was then translated into English.  His logic:  "I like to write ghost stories and nothing fits a ghost story better than a dying language.  The deader the language, the more alive the ghost."
     - Satan in Goray  (1955)
     - Gimpel the Fool  (1957)
     - Enemies, A Love Story  (1972)
     - Passion  (1975)
     - The Penitent  (1983)
     - The Image and Other Stories
     - The Death of Methuselah  (1988)
     - Scum  (1991)

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Smith, Dave  A poem of emotion and imagery titled, The Plowman

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Solzhenitsyn, Alexander;   - no satisfactory reference, historical, or literary sites yet located
Born in 1918, just before the Bolsheviks came to power in Russia.  He served with distinction in the Red Army during WWII, but was was arrested in 1945 and imprisoned in a labor camp for supposedly making a derogatory remark about Satlin.  He was not released from the labor camp until after Stalin's death in 1953.
     - One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich  - Solzhenitsyn's first published work
     - August 1914
     - The Gulag Archipelago 1918-1956

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Sophocles  (496 - 406/405 B.C.).  Bio on the Greek Drama page, the Classics' page bio, another short bio, yet another short bio, and a short page of facts about Sophocles.  Of the 123 plays written by Sophocles, only 7 survive in their entirety.  These include:
     - Ajax  - ca. 440 B.C.;  online text
     - The Trachiniae  - ca. 430 B.C.;  online text
     - Antigone  - First written and performed in the late 440s B.C.;   online text.  Also discussion / analysis notes
     - Oedipus at Colonus  - online text
     - Oedipus the King - written 428-430 B.C.. -??;   online text
     - Electra  - ca. 410 B.C.;  online text
     - Philoctetes  - ca. 409 B.C.;  online text

Also:
     - Poems by Sophocles  - online texts
     - Monologues from his plays  - online texts
     - The Great Books Index for Sophocles, with various translations and editions available online.

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Spenser, Edmund  (1552 - 1599).  Also the Spenser home page with bio, a list of resources online, another short bio, and online texts of various works, including:
     - The Faerie Queene
     - The Shepheardes Calender
     - Amoretti and Epithalamion
     - Fowre Hymns

Also:
     - Online texts for various works (click on "S" and scroll down to Spenser)

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Stafford, William  (1914 - 1993).  A short bio, and an interview with Jeff Gundy.  From the Jurors, Western Book Awards Lifetime Achievement in Poetry, 1992:  "[His] poems... bear witness to both the care and disregard around us---naming the places, catching the shine of the ordinary, pulling the rug out from under vanity and pretension, giving fresh credit to the selfless and decent, acknowledging the inevitable, nudging us toward observant lives and peaceful interactions."

Some poems online.  Also:
     - Traveling Through the Dark - won the National Book Award in 1963  - online text
     - Evening News
     - Turned in Late One Night
     - My Name is William Tell  - online text
     - Ask Me  - online text
     - Keepsakes
     - Some Things the World Gave
     - An Afternoon in the Stacks
     - Just Thinking  - online text
     - One Home  - online text
     - Toward the Space Age
     - Coronado Heights  - online text
     - Prairie Town  - online text
     - Next Time
     - Glances
     - After Arguing Against the Contention that Art Must Come from Discontent

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Steinbeck, John

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Stevens, Wallace  - modern poet

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Stevenson, Robert Louis  (1850-1894).  The Brandeis site with bio, bibliography, and links to online works; an extensive bio and bibliography; a brief bio; and another short bio from a UK site.  Another resource site, including quotes from Stevenson's works, online texts of a few of his novels, and links.

His complete poetry online, and a somewhat pretentious review of his work by The Atlantic.  Also:
     - Treasure Island  - online text
     - Kidnapped  - online text.  Another e-text online.
     - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde  - online text
     - The Dynamiter  - online text
     - The Black Arrow  - online text
     - Prince Otto  - online text
     - The Silverado Squatters, 1883 - online text
     - Across the Plains, 1892  - online text

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Stowe, Harriet Beecher  (Harrier Elisabeth Beecher) (1811 - 1896).  An extensive bio, a long bio and bibliography, a short bio, another short bio, and yet another short bio.
     - Uncle Tom's Cabin  - complete online text (left-hand column), notes and more notes
     - The Pearl of Orr's Island  (1862)
     - Oldtown Folks  (1869)

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Swift, Jonathan  (Born in Dublin in 1667.  Died in 1745).  Extensive bio, a shorter bio with an extensive bibliography (don't use the links), and anecdotes from the family (a partial autobiography).  Also wrote under the pseudonym Isaac Bickerstaff.

Selected poetry online, including:
     - A Description of a City Shower, 1710
     - The Progress of Poetry
     - Phillis, Or, the Progress of Love
     - A Description of the Morning  - 1709
     - A Satirical Elegy
     - On Stella's Birth-day 1719

A variety of works online for both reading and downloading, including:
     - A Tale of a Tub:  A Digression Concerning the Original, the Use, and Improvement of Madness in a Commonwealth.  A satire on corruptions in religion and learning.  Originally published in 1704; reached final form until 1710, in its 5th ed.   Online text
     - The Battle of the Books - satire on corruptions in religion and learning. Originally published in 1704; reached final form in 1710 in its 5th ed..  Online text
     - An Argument Against the Abolishing of Christianity in England  - online text.
     - Gulliver's Travels, 1726;   online text - index.  Another edition online.
     - A Modest Proposal, 1729;  online text

Also:
     - Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift
     - Cadenus and Vanessa   - poem

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Synge, J. M.  (John Millington Synge; 1871 - 1909).  His plays were produced at the Abbey Theatre, which Synge founded in 1904 along with Lady Gregory and William Butler Yeats.  Extensive bio, and brief bio, and poem hunter's links.

Plays online:
     - The Aran Islands, 1907; the journal of Synge's retreat to the Aran Islands.  Online text
     - The Playboy of the Western World  - Premiered in 1907.  The premiere of this play incited riots because of the "unromanticized, satiric treatment of the Irish peasantry--considered sacrosanct to many nationalists--and its (for the time) shocking language."  Online text and another version online
     - Riders to the Sea, 1904, a tragedy (considered one of the finest tragedies ever written.  Online text
     - In the Shadow of the Glen, 1903, a comedy.  Online text
     - The Well of the Saints, 1905.  Online text
     - The Tinker's Wedding  - Completed in 1908, but not produced for fear of inciting further riots.  Online text
     - Deirdre of the Sorrows  - unfinished tragedy, but which was produced in 1910 by the Abbey Players after Synge's death.  Online text
     - In Wicklow and West Kerry  - online text

Also, selected poetry online, including text and notes:
     - The Curse  - online text and notes
     - Danny  - online text and notes
     - On an Anniversary  - online text and notes
     - Queens  - online text and notes
     - The Passing of the Shee  - online text
     - Prelude  - online text

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Szymborska, Wislawa  (b. 1923).  Extensive bio and bibliography, short bio, and an even shorter bio.
     - People on a Bridge
     - Some Like Poetry  - online text
     - Pi  - online text
     - Sounds, Feelings, Thoughts
     - View with a Grain of Sand - Winner of the 1996 Nobel Prize for Literature, "for poetry that with ironic precision allows the historical and biological context to come to light in fragments of human reality"
     - Hunger Camp at Jaslo  - online text
     - Tortures  - online text

                       

                        We stand in the meadow where it became flesh,
                        and the meadow is silent as a false witness.

                                    - excerpt from Hunger Camp at Jaslo

                       

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T


Tan, Amy  (b. 1952).  American novelist, born in California, of Chinese immigrant parents; traveled and lived in Europe after the death of her brother and father from brain tumors; and attended various colleges.  Bio, and another bio., including an amusing note about why she left therapy after the murder of a friend.  Also, the Hall of Arts interview, the Bookreporter interview, and the Salon interview
      - The Joy Luck Club  (1989)
      - The Kitchen God's Wife  (1991)
      - The Hundred Secret Senses  (1995)
     - The Bonesetter's Daughter  - excerpt online (with author's approval)

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Tennyson, Alfred Lord  (1809-1883).  Portrait, chronological bio, a more extensive bio, and biblio a brief bio, and another brief bio.  Also, the complete text of Andrew Lang's biography of Tennyson.

Poetry online, and more poetry online.  Also:
     - Charge of the Light Brigade  - online text
     - In Memoriam  - online text
     - St. Agnes' Eve
     - Flower in the Crannied Wall  - online text
     - Lucretius  - online text
     - Ulysses  - online text
     - The Lotus Eaters (The Lotos Eaters)  - online text

                       

                        "Courage!" he said, and pointed toward the land,
                        "This mounting wave will roll us shoreward soon."

                                              - first two lines of The Lotus Eaters

                       

     - All Things Must Die (All Things Will Die) - online text
     - Crossing the Bar  - online text

If you really feel you must... A dry, self-serving, pretentious analysis and critique of various Tennyson poems.

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Thackeray, William Makepeace  (Born:  July 18, 1811 in Calcutta, India.  Died:  December 24, 1863).  Bio and bibliography; a brief bio, a blithe and snotty bio, a chronological bio, an extensive bio in essay form, and Peter Shillingsburg's critique of Thackeray's biographers.  A Thackeray site on the Victorian web.

A site for online texts of his work.  Also:
     - Vanity Fair - Thackeray's first major novel, and considered to be his masterpiece.  Set in the period of the Napoleonic Wars, but intended as a satirical statement about early/mid-Victorian England.  It was published as a serial novel, beginning in 1847.  Online text, and an overview/critique.
     - Chronicle of the Drum  - online text
     - The History of Henry Esmond  - online text
     - The Bedford Row Conspiracy  - online text.  Another version online
     - The Adventures of Major Gahagan  - online text.  Another version (The Tremendous Adventures of Major Gahagan) online.
     - Irish Sketchbook, 1843
     - The Newcomes, 1853
     - The Virginians, 1857
     - Some Roundabout Papers  - online text and another version online.

                 

                 The wicked are wicked, no doubt, and they go astray and they fall,
                 and they come by their deserts; but who can tell the mischief
                 which the very virtuous do?

                               - from The Newcomes

                 

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Thomas, Dylan  - poet  (b. 1914, in Swansea, Wales.  d.1953).  Bio and biblio; short bio, bibliography, and photos; another short bio, and an even more brief bio.  Highly recommended poet!
     - Where once the waters of your face  (1934)
     - A refusal to mourn the death, by fire, of a child in London  (1944)
     - The Force that Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower  - online text
     - A Child's Christmas in Wales  - online text
     - In the white giant's thigh  (1953)
     - Do not go gentle into that good night  - online text
     - Poem in October  - online text
     - Fern Hill  - online text

                 

                  Do not go gentle into that good night,
                  Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
                  Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

                  Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
                  Because their words had forked no lightning they
                  Do not go gentle into that good night.

                  Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
                  Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
                  Rage, rage against the dying the light.

                  Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
                  And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
                  Do not go gentle into that good night.

                  Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
                  Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
                  Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

                  And you, my father, there on the sad height,
                  Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
                  Do not go gentle into that good night,
                  Rage, rage, against the dying of the light.

                 

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Thompson, Hunter S.  Hunter Stockton Thompson.  1939 - 2005.  Death by -- predictably, one almost wants to say -- suicide, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound*.  Whether or not it's the cas,e it seems fitting that the fantasy of gonzo-journalism and the attacks on American hypocrisy end with a suicide, the result of idealism that could not be resolved with life as an icon in mainstream culture.   From a recent NY Times article:  "Hunter Stockton Thompson was born in Louisville, Ky, on July 18, 1939, the son of an insurance agent. He was educated in the public school system and joined the United States Air Force after high school. There, he was introduced to journalism, covering sports for an Air Force newspaper at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. He was honorably discharged in 1958 and then worked a series of jobs writing for small-town newspapers."
     - Hell's Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga  (1967)
     - Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas:  A Savage Journey into the Heart of the American Dream  (1971)
     - Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72  (1973)
     - The Great Shark Hunt  (1979)
     - The Curse of Lono  (1983)
     - Generation of Swine  (1988)
     - Songs of the Doomed  (1990)
     - Fear and Loathing in Elko  (1992)
     - Better than Sex:  Confessions of a Campaign Junkie  (1993)

*A note on suicide by gunshot:  If you decide to do this in your home, be aware that the family members who survive you will be evicted, possibly for years, as long as the police case into this death is open.  Since it's probably suicide (as opposed to murder, where a bad guy is potentially running around), there won't be any urgency to solve the case.  If your wife doesn't have the money to pay both the mortgage and the costs of deposits, first and last month, etc., for an apartment in the meantime, or if she can't afford a hotel for months on end for the family -- while still paying the mortgage and utilities (lack of heat can allow mold to grow, which can destroy property) on the home, that's too bad .  If she's not allowed to get the children's clothes out of the house, too bad.  She'll just have to find the hundreds of dollars to buy new clothes, from socks and underwear, to shoes, winter coats, hats and gloves. to toothpaste, shampoo, soap, washcloths, towels, etc..  The family pets won't be allowed to stay, and access even to the family cars may be denied.  The family will not be allowed to take away food or pantry stocks, kitchen utensils, glasses or dishes, clothes, coats, pet food, etc.  No family photo albums, no computer or archive disks for the taxes due next week, no insurance papers, no medical records, no transcripts or resumes, none of the children's school references, no sentimental items.  Your family will be completely removed from the crime scene until the case is officially closed.  As far as the police are concerned, your wife and kids can stay at some homeless shelter or live out of the car, and no one actually needs a pet anyway.  Losing the home, clothes, pets, lifestyle is not a concern of the police.

Then there is the aftermath.  Gunshot suicides tend to blow bits of bone and hair into the drywall, ceiling, and floor.  Carpets, cupboards, parquet, tile, cupboards, drawers, and anything on the walls, floors or doors is often ruined.  Even wood stoves and other seemingly impervious substances can be ruined by the amazing force of the debris as it becomes embedded.  Anything in the room or in the line-of-sight through any opening (doorway, hallway, etc), including furniture, artwork, TV, stereo, books, knick-knacks, kitchen appliances, pianos, guitars, children's toys, etc. can and will be destroyed by bone shards and other debris shot wildly into their surfaces at virtually the same velocity of the bullet.

If you have no family, no pets, no one to whom you owe any responsibility, fine.  But if you leave family behind, then at least bother to be aware of the full consequences of your act.  It's one thing to remove yourself from the world.  It is a criminal act to steal all of these things -- home, clothing, food, warmth, medicines, security and even livelihood -- from those you leave behind.  Bad enough that they're dealing with your cowardice, ultimate rejection, and the physical and nightmarish horror of coming upon the splattered debris you've left of yourself.  To lose everything else on top of that?  

It's something to keep in mind.

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Thoreau, Henry David  (1817 - 1862)  Also an obnoxious site that highlights phrases all over the place, but which has bio notes, bibliography, and online texts.
     - Resistance to Civil Government  - online text.  Visually obnoxious site.
     - Walden, or Life in the Woods  - online text
     - Slavery in Massachusetts, 1854  - online text
     - Life without Principle, 1863  - online text
     - Civil Disobedience, 1849  - online text and another site (plain courrier font)
     - A Plea for Captain John Brown  - online text
     - Journals and Letters

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Thucydides (ca. 471 - 400 B.C.)
     - The History of the Peloponnesian War  - online text

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Thurber, James Grover   ( b? - 1961)
     - The Beast in Me and Other Animals  - Including The Beast in the Dingle, the famous parody of Henry James, and The Dewey Dewey Fog--a warning about the 1948 presidential election
     - Men, Women and Dogs
     - My World--and Welcome to It
     - The White Deer

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Tolstoy, Leo  (Count Leo Tolstoy).  Bio and selected bibliography, and a brief bio.  Texts of works online, and a chronological bio and more works online.
     - Anna Karenina  - online text.  Another version, and yet another version.
     - War and Peace  - online text
     - On Civil Disobedience and Non-Violence
     - Confession (life as a meaningless failure)  - online text.  Another version.

Also:  The Last Days of Leo Tolstoy, 1911, by Vladimir Chertkov, Tolstoy's long-time personal secretary.  Translated by Benjamin Sher.

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Twain, Mark.  - Pseudonym of Samuel Clemens.  See Samuel Clemens

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U


Updike, John  (b. 1932).  Fairly extensive bio.  Brief biblio and links, and a more extensive bibliography.  Also:  Library of Congress citations; and  The Salon Interview with Updike.
     - Toward the End of Time
     - Rabbit, Run, 1960
     - Couples, 1978
     - Rabbit is Rich, 1981, which won the Pulitzer prize

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V

"A poem is never finished, only abandoned."
            - Paul Valery


Virgil  - Publius Virgilius Maro (70-19 B.C.)  Various quotes (hard to read; ugly format).
     - The Eclogues  - online text.  An adaptation of the pastoral idylls written by Theocritus.
     - The Georgics  - online text.  A treatise/poem of approximately 2000 lines, describing agriculture, cereal crops, trees, cattle, and beekeeping.  Including:
          - The Aeneid
          - Prologue
          - Orpheus and Eurydice.  This myth was possibly invented by Virgil; no known precedent exists of this story.  The myth appears at the end of the fourth book of the Georgics which describes beekeeping.  From The Norton Book of Classical Literature:  "The reason (or pretext) for its appearance at the end of a long and fascinating account of bees and beekeeping is that it gives a mythical explanation of bugonia, literally, `generation from cattle'--a method of creating a swarm of  bees discussed by many ancient writers... that has more to do with folklore than reality.  A two-year-old bullock is beaten to death (no blood spilt) and the corpse enclosed in a small shed; after some months a new swarm of bees emerges from the corruption of the flesh.  The famous riddle of Samson in Judges XIV--`out of the strong came forth sweetness...'--is based on a similiar belief."

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Voltaire  (1694 - 1778).  Francois-Marie Arouet, born in Paris on November 21, 1694.  Died May 30, 1778.  The French genius of the Enlightenment, Arouet, created the pseudonym, Voltaire, in 1718, after being exiled within France to Sully-Sur-Loire, imprisoned in the Bastille without trial, and banished from Paris for publishing political satires.  Later, after creating his pseudonym and publishing Oedipe and La Henriade, he had a falling out with a powerful, aristocratic family, was imprisoned again in the Bastille, and finally exiled to England.

A theatrically oriented bio, a chronological bio, and another fairly extensive bio.  An interesting bio dealing more with religion, politics, and criticism.  A short article on the public beatings he endured for mocking the aristocracy.

Also:
       - Oedipe  - Voltaire's first major work, published in 1718
       - La Henriade  - An epic poem about Henry Navarre; published in 1723
       - Zadig  - philosophical work; published in 1748
       - Micromegas  - (1752)
       - Candide  - Voltaire's greatest and most popular philosophical novel;  overview, and more online notes and full text.  Also, another overview with discussion questions.
       - Dictionnaire philosophique  (1764)
       - L'Ingenu  (1767)
       - Le Taureau Blanc  (1773-1774)
       - Irene  (1778)

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W

"A thing is not necessarily true because a man dies for it."
                   - From The Portrait of Mr. W.H., by Oscar Wilde


Warren, Robert Penn  (1905 - ??).  Also the Modern Poets site for Warren, and a brief bio.  A Nobel Laureate for poetry, 1986-1987, Warren is the author of ten novels, twelve volumes of poetry, various short stories and critical essays, and one play.  
     - All the King's Men (1946) - Awarded the Pulitzer Price for Fction.
     - Promises (1957) - Won the Pulitzer Price for Poetry, the Edna St. Vincent Millay Prize of the Poetry Society of America, and the National Book Award.
     - Selected Poems:  New and Old (1923-1966) - Received the Bollingen Prize in Poetry.

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Webster, John - Considered one of the last great Elizabethan playwrights.  After his death, Elizabethan theatre began to decline, succumbing to the works of mediocre writers.  Webster is estimated to have lived from 1580 - 1684.  Brief bio.
      - The White Devil, tragedy, 1609 - 1612
      - The Duchess of Malfi, tragedy, 1612 - 1613
      - The Devil's Law-Case, tragi-comedy, 1617 - 1621

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Whitman, Ruth  (b. 1922).  Harvard University Press obituary

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Whitman, Walt  (1819 - 1892).  Also: links
     - Leaves of Grass  (1855); critics' reviews from 1855

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Wilde, Oscar   (1854 - 1900).  Born Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde in Dublin on October 15, 1854.  Died in Paris of cerebral meningitis on November 30, 1900.  An extensive site about Wilde, an interesting and extensive bio, a short bio, a brief bio, an Irish site bio, and the brief Encarta bio.  Also, student essays on Wilde.

Online text of his poems, and Bartleby's online texts.  Also:
    - Poems  (1881)
    - The Canterville Ghost  (1887)
    - Lord Arthur Savile's Crime  (1887)
    - The Model Millionaire
    - The Sphinx Without a Secret
    - The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888)
    - The Portrait of Mr. W.H.  (1889 - shorter, tigher version)          
    - The Picture of Dorian Gray  (1890)  --  "A man cannot be too careful in the choice of his enemies."
    - Intentions  (1890)
    - Lady Windermere's Fan  (1893)
    - Salome  (1893)
    - The Sphinx  (1894)
    - A Woman of No Importance  (1894)
    - An Ideal Husband  (1895)  --  "When the gods wish to punish us they answer our prayers."
    - The Importance of Being Ernest  (1895)
    - The Ballad of Reading Gaol  (1898)
    - De Profundis

A poet can survive everything but a misprint.
                    - From The Children of the Poets, Oscar Wilde

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Williams, Carlos William   Also:  site which includes links to poetry, commentaries, (click on "W" to jump down to the list of Williams links), another brief bio and links, a site with annotated works.

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Woolf, Virginia  (Born in London in 1882;  died 1941).  Bio, another bio, a brief chronological bio, her psychiatric history, another short bio, the international society's biblio and links page, and an interesting site that answers questions about Woolf.  Also, college essay information about Woolf.
  - The Voyage Out, 1915  - online text   - Flush, 1933      
- Night and Day, 1919  - online text - The Years, 1933
- Kew Gardens, 1921 - Three Guineas, 1938
- Monday or Tuesday, 1921  - online text - Between the Acts, 1941
- Jacob's Room, 1922 - The Death of the Moth and Oth. Ess, 1942
- The Common Reader, First Series, 1925 - A Haunted House and Oth. Shrt St, 1944
- Mrs. Dalloway, 1925 - The Moment and Other Essays, 1947
- To the Lighthouse, 1927 - The Captain's Death Bed and Oth. Ess., 1950
- Orlando, 1928 - A Writer's Diary, 1954
- A Room of One's Own, 1929 - Granite and Rainbow, 1958
- The Waves, 1931 - Mrs. Dalloway's Party, 1973
- The Second Common Reader, 1932 - Freshwater, 1976
- Moments of Being, 1976

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Wordsworth, William  (1770 - 1850).  A long bio, a brief bio.  Also an extensive bibliography, online texts of his poetry (with obnoxious pop-ups), and another complete list of poems with online texts.

                 

                  To a Sexton

                  Let thy wheel-barrow alone--
                  Wherefore, Sexton, piling still
                  In thy bone-house bone on bone?
                  'Tis already like a hill
                  In a field of battle made,
                  Where three thousand skulls are laid;
                  These died in peace each with the other,--
                  Father, sister, friend, and brother.

                  Mark the spot to which I point!
                  From this platform, eight feet square, 10
                  Take not even a finger-joint:
                  Andrew's whole fire-side is there.
                  Here, alone, before thine eyes,
                  Simon's sickly daughter lies,
                  From weakness now, and pain defended,
                  Whom he twenty winters tended.

                  Look but at the gardener's pride--
                  How he glories, when he sees
                  Roses, lilies, side by side,
                  Violets in families! 20
                  By the heart of Man, his tears,
                  By his hopes and by his fears,
                  Thou, too heedless, art the Warden
                  Of a far superior garden.

                  Thus then, each to other dear,
                  Let them all in quiet lie,
                  Andrew there, and Susan here,
                  Neighbours in mortality.
                  And, should I live through sun and rain
                  Seven widowed years without my Jane, 30
                  O Sexton, do not then remove her,
                  Let one grave hold the Loved and Lover!

                 

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X

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Y

Irrational streams of blood are staining earth...

              - William Butler Yeats


Yeats, William Butler  (1865 - 1939)  The Yeats Society, including links, bibliographies, etc.  Bio, another bio, a more extensive bio, brief info and links, and a longer list of links.  Yeats was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1923.

Note that the poetry of Yeats has recently gone back into copyright in England, and is no longer available online at English sites.  However, his works are out of copyright in the United States of America, and so you can still locate online texts of his poetry on some American sites.

Columbia University's Bartlesby Archive, with selected works online.  Also some selected poems online:
     - Into the Twilight  - online text
     - The Song of the Old Mother  - online text
     - A Cradle Song  - online text
     - The Moods  - online text

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Z

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Copyright 2004 Tara K. Harper

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